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Common misunderstandings about child custody

On Behalf of | Dec 9, 2022 | Family Law

Child custody is one of the most complex issues of any divorce, and parents naturally want to do everything possible to protect the best interests of their children. In some cases, this may mean one parent retains custody of the children, but most of the time, kids benefit when allowed to maintain a strong relationship with both of their parents after a divorce. This is only one aspect of child custody you may want to consider as you make decisions for your child’s future. 

It is also important to ensure that misconceptions about child custody do not affect your final order. You may think you know all of your options, or you may assume that you know what terms would be best. However, it is in your interests to take all factors into consideration before you finalize your custody and visitation order. 

Custody myths you may believe 

The terms of your final custody and visitation order will impact your children for years to come. They will also impact the role you have in important life decisions for your child, how often you see him or her, and much more. As you navigate these complex issues, you may consider if you believe any of the following common myths about child custody: 

  • Custody is all or nothing – In reality, there are two types of custody, legal and physical custody. Parents may share complete joint custody, or one parent may retain legal or physical custody. 
  • No one but a parent can have custody – In specific circumstances, other family members may have a claim to custody if the parents are unable to maintain their role in the life of the child. 
  • Mothers are more likely to get custody – While courts used to favor mothers, they now typically prefer to grant joint custody in order to provide the kids with equitable access to both parents. 
  • A court will make all custody decisions – Parents have the right to make custody decisions through discussions and negotiations instead of going through a difficult litigation process. 

With so much at stake, it is important to have all of the information you need to make the best possible decisions. Before you agree to terms or make any decisions that could impact your children, you may find it helpful to seek experienced guidance regarding all child custody and visitation-relation decisions. 

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