Parents across Arizona and other states file for separation and eventually divorce their former spouses because of issues ranging from cheating to financial problems. During the proceedings, the judge will look at factors and determine both a child support order and a custody agreement. This order will name one person as the custodial parent and the other individual as the noncustodial parent. People can request a modification or change in either order if they think that they need one.

A noncustodial parent losing his or her job is the most common reason why a court will modify a child support order. Judges base the size of the order on the income that the individual makes and the amount needed to raise the child. If the noncustodial parent does not work or works fewer hours than before, it’s possible to change the order.

A judge may issue a child support modification order when a noncustodial parent believes that the custodial parent is not doing a good job of raising their child or puts him or her in danger. The judge may even ask that Child Protective Services (CPS) investigate that parent. The modification can also occur because one person moves to a new city or either individual violates the established order.

Breaking the established court order can land either parent in jail and lead to further issues in the future. Parents should always look out for their children’s best interests and work together with their attorneys. A lawyer who handles Arizona child support cases can speak with noncustodial parents and help them understand how much they might pay in support and how often they can see their children. The various factors that determine both child support and custody can include with whom the child wants to live and who can provide a better environment for him or her.