Parents in Arizona who get a divorce might also have to work out a parenting schedule. They should not treat this as an opportunity to get back at one another because they are angry about the divorce. The parenting schedule’s purpose is for the child to be able to build a healthy relationship with both parents post-divorce.

With this in mind, parents should think about what will be convenient for the child and not for them. They should consider the logistics of where each of them lives and the distance from the child’s school. They should also consider the child’s activities outside of school. Older children sometimes want to have a say in the schedule. Particular considerations may need to be in place for children with special needs.

Some parents may be tempted to make a schedule based on future plans. For example, one parent might plan to move closer in the future. However, it is too easy for these types of plans to change, and it is best to focus on the current situation. Parents may also have to accept that while they have different parenting styles, neither of those styles is necessarily better than the other. If parents cannot agree, they might have to go to court for a judge to make a decision.

Negotiating custody and visitation can be difficult and emotional, and parents might also be worried about child support. Usually, the noncustodial parent pays this to the custodial parent, and it should cover some of the child’s basic expenses. If the parent is unable to keep up with the payments because of a change in circumstances, such as a drop in income, that parent might be able to ask for a modification. A parent cannot alter the visitation arrangement because of nonpayment of child support.