If a parent in Arizona is not granted custody of a child, that person is likely to be granted visitation rights. However, a visitation schedule may not look the same for all households. In some cases, a parent may be allowed to see a child on weekends or on alternating weeks. It is also possible that a parent will get to his or her child during school vacations or during the holidays.

The exact arrangement depends on the needs of the children as well as where the parents are located. A younger child may need to have a set routine, which means spending the week with the custodial parent and the weekend with the noncustodial parent may be best. Older children with parents who live close to each other may benefit from spending one week with a parent before spending the next week with the other parent.

When there is reason to believe that a child may be in harm’s way when around a parent, supervised visitation may be ordered. This means that another person will monitor the visit to ensure the safety of the child. In some cases, the visit may take place in a public location for the child’s safety. These locations may include a friend’s house or some other neutral area.

In addition to financial child support, visitation rights may help a parent be a positive influence in a child’s life. The emotional support and guidance a mother or father may provide may help a young person grow into a healthy and mature adult. An attorney may be able to assist a parent in obtaining visitation rights. In some cases, legal counsel may be a valuable asset to those who are seeking legal or physical custody of their sons or daughters.